India

Don and Cathy Iverson began serving the Lord’s church in India in 1997.  The work in which they are involved is primarily in the southern most state of Tamil Nadu.  Don works to establish schools of preaching, children’s homes and assists in benevolence works.  Cathy teaches ladies and assists in the work at the orphanage.  Don is self-supported, operating his outdoor advertising business in North Carolina, and travels and works in India four times annually (usually).  Don works under the oversight of the elders at the Main Street church of Christ in Crossville, Tennessee.  The Goodlettsville Church of Christ assist with funding to allow Don to continue this great work.   
 
 
 
Schools of Preaching:  The Banner Elk church of Christ, of which Don is a member, supports twenty preacher training schools in south India.  At present, 345 men are enrolled.  Most of these schools are one-year programs, training men to be self-supported in their evangelism work.  Three schools are three-year programs for the most serious students.  Three schools are evening schools in which men attend nightly, ten hours per week, receiving no financial compensation.  In each class, men are tested over three memory verses.  Additionally, an examination is given in each class.
 
 
 

Children's Home:  The first home, named Deva Anbu Illam, was started in 2002 in Coimbatore.  Cottages on the campus are houses for one house mother and six or seven children.  Almost all of these children are without both mother and father.  The total number of children in the Coimbatore orphanage is currently 120.  The second facility is being constructed in Tirunelveli, approximately 250 miles south.  There are four parentless children now living in this new home.  The children attend government schools, and receive daily Bible training by the DAI staff.  All staff, except for the medical doctor held on retainer, are faithful members of the church of Christ .

 
 
 
 
Benevolence:  In fulfilling the commandment of James 1:27, the Iversons help to assist many widows in India.  This is usually done through the purchase of goats, or other training to make the widows self-supported.  A vast amount of relief work was also done during the 2004 tsunami.  This resulted in 71 new congregations and three new schools of preaching.